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Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Academic and Research Libraries

September 19, 2012 Leave a comment

In January of this year (2012) the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) published what most academic and medical librarians now know of as “the code.”  Within copyright there’s an allowance known as fair use.  Since this is a gray area, the ARL interviewed hundred of librarians and came up with a code of best practices in fair use so that all academic librarians can put up a united front against the publishers who basically way too frequently think that there is no such thing as fair use.  I had the opportunity to attend two of the panels presenting the new code and information on fair use.  One was at MIT and the other was at Northeastern University.  This post will consist of my notes as well as links to the code’s website, guides, and contact info.

What is the Purpose of Copyright?

  • To promote the creation of culture by giving people who create it a perk with limited monopoly and encouraging new makers to use existing culture.  The human process of creating culture is collaborative at its base.

Biggest Balancing Feature:

  • Fair Use–legal, unauthorized use of copyrighted material–under some circumstances

So what is fair use?

  • a space for creativity
    • for lawyers
    • for users
    • for judges
  • created in the 1840s by judges but not in writing til 1976

Four Factors of Fair Use

  1. Reason for the use
  2. Kind of work used
  3. Amount used → is it appropriate?
  4. Effect on the market

The Good News

  • Judges love it and love using the factors
  • Supreme Court: fair use protects free speech
  • Judicial interpretation has shifted greatly since 1990

Things Judges Ask

  • Is your use transformative?
    • Are you adding to the culture
    • Are you an innovator
  • Did you use the amount that is appropriate to satisfy the transformative use

Transform?

  • use of works in scholarly study when they’re not intended for scholarly study
  • PLUS custom and practice of individual creative communities especially when well-documented
    • When judges hear a good story about why what you’re doing as a community is transformative, they want to side with you

Best Practices Codes

  • Communities that use them:
    • documentary filmmakers
    • scholars
    • online video
    • dance productions
  • principles not rules
  • limitations not bans
  • reasoning not rote

Why Fair Use Matters to Librarians

  • Libraries preserve culture. To keep them alive means copying especially digital.
  • Patrons need answers now.
  • Can libraries stay relevant to the future by serving patrons from a distance?
  • Projects/needs that seem important aren’t getting done or are being abandoned because of risk aversion (fear of getting sued).
  • Put legal risks into perspective “mission risk.”

The Code of Best Practices
“Nobody really wants to sue. They just want to scare you.”
“Fair use is like a muscle.”
The more people who expressly go forward with fair use, the more protection we all have.

  1. eReserves
    It is fair to provide access to teaching materials (digitally) for students and professors.

    1. Spontaneity is not the law.  You can reuse course reserves (repeated use).
    2. The 1976 Guidelines are not the law.
    3. If you’re not in the class, you don’t get access. Passwords.
    4. Are you making a good faith effort to limit the use to fair use?
    5. There’s a difference between access and distribution.
  2. Exhibits both physical and virtual
  3. Digitizing to preserve at-risk items, but only when you can’t buy it and it is in a format that is becoming outdated but not yet obsolete.
  4. Digital collections of archives and special collections
  5. Access to research and teaching materials for disabled users.
  6. Institutional repositories, for example dissertations, theses
    Writers of dissertations/theses have a right to deposit their work in the repository without getting copyright rights from those whose work they’ve quoted/cited.  This code aims to help libraries stand by authors and help places like ProQuest understand fair use.
  7. Data-mining/Finding aids.
    1. When you google, you’re not searching the internet.  You’re searching google’s copy of the internet.  This is legal under fair use.
  8. Making topically-based collections of Web-based material.
    1. You’re collecting for a particular reason for a different use than the original creators had.

General Advice

  • Libraries are not liable for bad things that their users do.
  • Get your counsel involved when things aren’t in crisis mode.  It will help them understand you and your needs for potential future crises.
  • Bring the code of best practices to the counsel as a conversation piece.
  • Reliance on code of best practices is good evidence of good faith.
  • Librarians need to own fair use reasoning and get students and professors to do it too.
  • This is a free speech right.  We need to empower patrons and move them to agency.
  • A library can avoid or reduce liabilities by having proactive staff.  Develop fair use practice standards in your community.
  • You can create your own culture that doesn’t view fair use as risky.
  • In the context of fair use, the perfect document with all the answers is unattainable.
  • Key questions to ask:
    • Is it appropriate?
    • Is it reasonable?
    • Are you using it in good faith?
  • It is not the case that by asking for permission you waive your fair use rights.
  • Sometimes asking for permission can even strengthen your fair use claim.
  • Checklists make rote something that is inherently fluid.  Instead you should simply be able to articulate if asked why it is an appropriate use.
  • We should be able to explain fair use to our people in plain language.  No legalese.

The Georgia State Case
Basically, a publisher sued Georgia State for their use of eReserves.  Read up on the case and the ruling here and here.

  • Classroom Guidelines created in the 1970s were intended as a floor but interpreted as a ceiling.  1990s cases against coursepacks found coursepacks aren’t fair use, so now they pay a use fee.  Code of Best Practices is the first to look at it from a library perspective.
  • What happened at GSU?
    What was at issue was not the software (ie Blackboard) but the amount of info on Electronic Reserves.
  • Publisher’s argument:
    * should have sought and paid permission for every item on Electronic Reserves
    * argued fair use checklist is weighted to fair use
    * GSU could have subscribed to annual access
  • Library’s argument:
    *  use of excerpt from books in this setting is fair use
    *  checklist properly used
    *  If GSU had an annual license from CCC, Cambridge University Press is not part of it anyway.
  • So how much is fair use?
  • CCC is contractually obligated to let publishers know if they think an infringement is going on.
  • If you’re arguing market impact, you have to show it.
  • 75 cases were submitted, of those only 5 instances of infringement found.
  • Court declined to issue injunction and ordered plaintiff to pay defendent’s legal fees.
  • Is the use transformative?
    *  using it in a new way
    *  the obvious exception is straight reproduction for classroom use
    *  the things that teachers use to teach are not usually created with the intention to use to teach, so this use is innately transformative.
    *  non-transformative use is 10 to 20%
    *  transformative use can be the whole thing.
    *  Textbooks are not transformative (made for teaching) so less fair use leeway.
  • The actual damages to the publisher was $750
  • Licenses “must be easily accessible, reasonably priced, and that they offer excerpts in a reasonable format.”
  • “We’re creating a situation where fair use will disappear if we don’t use it.”
  • The lawsuit is really just about scholarly nonfiction books.
  • This case isn’t precedent for anyone but GSU.

You can find much more information, including contact info for the panelists, on the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use website.

 

Friday Fun! (Into the Woods, Blog Tour Updates)

August 4, 2012 3 comments

Hello my lovely readers!

No, I have not lost my mind. I know today is Saturday.  Yesterday was just too busy to get a Friday Fun post up!

Right after work, I went to MIT where I was meeting a long-time friend (and her new significant other) for dinner followed by a local production of Stephen Sondheim’s Into the Woods.  I’d seen the recorded Broadway version, but never seen it live.  I was quite excited.

We had Mexican food for dinner (chips and guac ftw) then settled in for the play.  The local folks did quite a good job, showing lots of enthusiasm.  In particular, the women playing the Baker’s Wife and the Witch had superb singing abilities.  The set design was also creative and highly functional.  Most of the set changes from homes to the woods didn’t take long at all.  I also, as always, enjoyed “Hello Little Girl.”  Yes, I know it’s deliciously creepy, that’s the point, eh?

It was so nice to get out to see a show!  I hadn’t in a long time.  I also hadn’t seen my friend in forever, so it was great to catch up.

This was a quieter week in the Waiting For Daybreak blog tour, but still plenty of fun!

Gizmo’s Book Reviews interviewed me.  Check that out to see what celebrity I’d be most distracted by if s/he walked into a restaurant I was in.

Cynthia Shepp hosted a guest post in which I talked about why I chose Boston as a setting.  She also hosted a giveaway, which is now closed. Congrats to the winner!

That’s it!  As I said, a quieter week, but still containing lots of variety.  Both of these ladies were also an entire pleasure to work with.

In other writing/publishing news, I had a short story accepted this week!  It will be out in September.  Check out my publications page for more details.

Happy weekends!

Research Data Management Services (Social Sciences Librarian Boot Camp 2012)

June 2, 2012 Leave a comment

After the GIS hands-on session, I attended one final session presented by Katherine McNeill, Social Sciences Data Service and Economics Librarian at MIT.  This was a great session and included a discussion portion for sharing of ideas and challenges with colleagues.

  • There is a tradition of being able to replicate scientific results.
  • The NSF and NIH have data sharing requirements.
  • MIT librarians saw an opportunity to support faculty as data producers not just data consumers.
  • They now have a research data management team that provide: a workshop, website, data storage, and consultations.
  • The individual consultations consist of: initial meetings; advice on documentation, intellectual property, confidentiality, data conversion and file format issues; and facilitate deposit of data in archive or repository
  • Recommends “Conducting a Data Interview” by Witt and Carlson
  • Don’t be afraid to reach out to faculty.
  • It can be difficult for specialists to figure out how to make data accessible to undergrads or the everyman.
  • Issues to Consider
  • What is your organizational culture?
  • Assess the needs of your researchers.
  • Relationship to other departments in the university.
  • Relationship between data specialists and subject librarians.
  • Do the issues span disciplines or are they discipline specific?
  • Facilitating compliance without coming across as police.
  • Educate users to expect this service.
  • Determine level of service to be provided.
  • Learning from other institutions.
  • Recommended resources: IASSIST, Digital Curation Centre, ICPSRARL Resources for Data Management Planning
  • In conclusion, build on your expertise.  Be pioneering, thoughtful, proactive.  Let what faculty need be your guide.  Reach out to your colleagues.

Body Language and Elections (Social Sciences Librarian Boot Camp 2012)

June 2, 2012 Leave a comment

“Analyzing Participation of Voters in US Presidential Elections” Dr. Charles Stewart III, MIT

  • Recommends the book Southern Politics in State and Nation
  • Have elections gotten better since 2000?
  • Ideological claims amount to religious beliefs, not scientific beliefs.
  • Based on 2000 data between 1.5 and 2 million votes were lost to voting machines, 2 million to registration difficulties, and 1 million to voters getting frustrated on site and walking away.
  • All voting data for each state is online except for Massachusetts.
  • EAC–Election Assistance Commission
  • There has been real improvements in voting machines.
  • Recommends DataFerret (although, the website appears to be busted?)
  • We’re doing better at registering and counting votes, but do we feel better?  Although we’ve improved, Americans don’t believe it.
  • Recommends The Democracy Index: Why Our Election System Is Failing and How to Fix It

“Body Language” Dr. Joseph Tecce, Boston College

  • Extremes in body language and/or eye movement are red flags.
  • Negative feeling states always increase blink rate.
  • Positive feeling states always decrease blink rate.
  • Indicators of stress include: eye blinks, gaze aversion.
  • During the 2008 presidential debates, Obama blinked 62 times, and McCain blinked 104 times (per minute?)
  • Although we have no video of as high stress of a situation as a presidential debate of Romney, the current video of him on a panel shows a 16 blink rate.
  • Tecce predicts that Romeny and Obama are going to have a very close election.
  • Blink rate of televised presidential candidates during their debates predict 100% who will win, except in 2000.
  • Thus, we know that blink rate predicts the popular vote.
  • Social cue hypothesis: body language is not just a social cue, it’s an indicator.
  • You cant tell when someone is lying from one indicator, but it’s a good sign to be on alert.

“Forecasting Elections” Munish Puri, Recorded Future

  • Perspective is affected by the four p’s: perch, point of view, period, permanence.
  • When talking or writing about forecasting, it’s important to consider the point of view of the predictor.
  • political risk–how politics impact business
  • Make and falsify predictions by using: probability, impact, and time range.
  • Recommended tools to monitor and watch elections: Electionista, WaPo Modifiable Model, GooglePortal, Yahoo Clues
  • Insight big data can show us: signal, shift, blindspot, outlier, and flashpoints
  • Recommends Evernote and MindManager

 

Friday Fun! (MIT Mystery Hunt)

January 28, 2011 3 comments

Hello my lovely readers!  Sorry I missed Friday Fun last week.  Since nothing that exciting happened last weekend or this week, I thought I’d tell you about the MIT Mystery Hunt I participated in the weekend before.  That was the original plan for last week’s Friday Fun anyway. ;-)

Team Unicorn friends Jeremy and Amy invited me to participate in their team in this year’s MIT Mystery Hunt.  Basically, every January a bunch of groups of nerdy people get together and solve a series of mystery puzzles in a competition to win the coin and the hunt.    That winning team then wins the privilege of designing the next year’s puzzle.  It lasts from Friday mid-day to sometime on Sunday.  I was pretty nervous going in, because I really didn’t know what I was getting myself into.  Also I’d heard the people who participate are brilliant, and while I consider myself to be intelligent, I never claimed to be a genius.  ;-)  Plus, the teams are fairly large (I think there are 30ish members?  Correct me if I’m wrong, Amy and Jeremy), and I only knew two team members going in….so yeah.  I was nervous.  But I was also excited!

I arrived after work on Friday and walked into a room full of tables of groups of people crowded around their laptops, as well as a few people at chalkboards and a table of food in the corner.  I delayered from coming in from outside, tossed my bag of chips onto the communal pile, and kind of hesitated for a second.  A gal I didn’t know immediately started talking to me and invited me to join the puzzle she and a couple of other gals were working on.  It turned out that the puzzle had to do with musicals, and well, none of them knew much about musicals.  You guys.  Musicals have been my forte since I was 5 years old.  So I jumped right in and started learning how the puzzling goes about.

A burrito run, some chit-chat, and some solving later, and I found myself totally engrossed in the world of puzzling.  Not only were the puzzles really challenging, but the way they’re designed you need a group of people to work on them.  A combination of everyone’s strengths.  It naturally leads to group work in a way I never experienced in the classroom.  Plus, everyone I met on the team was super-nice, friendly, and welcoming.  They were funny and fun to hang out with.  Shortly I found myself talking off-topic with one of the gals and found out we live in the same general area of Boston.  We hit it right off discussing zombies and True Blood, and I felt right at home.  I wound up showing up for each day of the puzzling, even though at first I wasn’t sure if I’d like it enough to.  I also may have ordered a team tshirt and promised to come next year as well. ;-)

It was a real blast, and I encourage any nerds to participate.  You can participate from a distance via internet connection if you want, so you don’t have to be local to play.  Thanks a bunch, Amy and Jeremy, for encouraging me to come play!  It was one of my best weekends I’ve had in Boston.

 

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